A free webinar for broadcasters from Nextradio and Tagstation

Wednesday, July 16, 2014 2:00–3:30pm EST

 Purpose:

Now is the time to think about radio’s place in tomorrow’s interactive dashboard.  We invite all broadcasters to join us as we share the future of radio in the car and how NextRadio and TagStation provides an interactive content solution that preserves the future of broadcast radio in the car dashboard. Industry leading perspective from Paul Jacobs and Paul Brenner will help guide the presentation.

This free informational event will include:

 An overview of the Connected Car
 NextRadio and TagStation benefits for the Connected Car
 Learn how your stations can benefit from this platform
 Plenty of Q&A

When/where:

The webinar will take place Wednesday, July 16, 2014 2:00–3:30pm EST via live video stream. You will receive details about how to view the webinar and participate in the Q&A upon registration.

The webinar will be presented by Paul Jacobs VP/GM of Jacobs Media and Paul Brenner, SVP/Chief Technology Officer at Emmis Communications

Click here to Register!

 

Paul JacobsPaul Jacobs is a leading radio consultant running the day-to-day operations VP/GM of Jacobs Media, the nation’s leading rock radio consulting firm. He is also president of its incredibly successful mobile apps division,jacAPPS. With more than 30 years of broadcast experience on his side, his viewpoints on radio’s future in connected car dashboard are invaluable.

 

BrennerHeadShot427x640Paul Brenner is SVP/chief technology officer for Emmis Communications
focusing on technology business development, industry partnerships,
broadcast engineering strategy, and the development of new broadcasting and
Internet content distribution systems. He is also the president of the
Broadcast Traffic Consortium, and leads the TagStation data service and
NextRadio smartphone app development teams.

Together, Jacobs and Brenner make a compelling case for the radio industry
to prepare for what is already in development – car dashboards in which
traditional radio will find itself suddenly needing to compete for its prime
spot.